Category Archives:

change agility

10 Tips on How to Co-present a Presentation

This week, I co-presented a webinar with Jocelyn Bérard called Change Agility: Mastering Constant Change

We gave a similar keynote presentation at the Canadian Society for Training and Development (CSTD) Conference in November. Although the content was similar, the format was very different. The biggest change was that we couldn’t see any of the over 500 participants. 

In many ways, webinars are easier to lead than in-person presentations: you can use your notes, you are sitting down and you don’t have to think about your gestures.

There are also some challenges with this format: vocal mistakes are more noticeable, any background noise is a distraction and the only way to convey emotions is through your voice. 

Technical risks are just as big. Fortunately, we had Sarah managing IT and production. She flawlessly managed the communication software, emceeing, polling questions and choreography.

What I loved most was the partnership the three of us shared. Like any productions, it takes a well-coordinated team to make them work well.

Here are some tips on how to partner on a presentation:

  • Write a script―it improves flow and leaves little to chance
  • Listen and be open to your partners’ recommendations―it leads to better quality and personal growth
  • Show up well-rehearsed―this is a given for trust-building and ability to perform
  • Arrive very early―remove a risk that would let down your audience and partners
  • Practice as a team―co-presentations are like dances: you must be in step with your partner for them to look good
  • Focus your practice time on transitions―hand-offs have the highest risk of going wrong
  • Know the technology―Sarah was the expert, but she needed to educate us on its fine points for the recording to work well
  • Discuss what could go wrong―contingency plans lead to fast corrections
  • Have an sense of humour―it builds and communicates rapport
  • Eat together―I remember Neil Peart, of the band Rush, talking about the importance of sharing meals with his band mates (Jocelyn shared his lunch with me twice!)

The presentation went well and as planned. We had a great time interacting with participants and ourselves. When we finished our closing comments and the recording ended, my first thought was ‘when would we get the opportunity to partner again?’ A partnership doesn’t get any better than this.

Phil

10 Tips on How to Co-present a Presentation

This week, I co-presented a webinar with Jocelyn Bérard called Change Agility: Mastering Constant Change

We gave a similar keynote presentation at the Canadian Society for Training and Development (CSTD) Conference in November. Although the content was similar, the format was very different. The biggest change was that we couldn’t see any of the over 500 participants. 

In many ways, webinars are easier to lead than in-person presentations: you can use your notes, you are sitting down and you don’t have to think about your gestures.

There are also some challenges with this format: vocal mistakes are more noticeable, any background noise is a distraction and the only way to convey emotions is through your voice. 

Technical risks are just as big. Fortunately, we had Sarah managing IT and production. She flawlessly managed the communication software, emceeing, polling questions and choreography.

What I loved most was the partnership the three of us shared. Like any productions, it takes a well-coordinated team to make them work well.


Here are some tips on how to partner on a presentation:

  • Write a script―it improves flow and leaves little to chance
  • Listen and be open to your partners’ recommendations―it leads to better quality and personal growth
  • Show up well-rehearsed―this is a given for trust-building and ability to perform
  • Arrive very early―remove a risk that would let down your audience and partners
  • Practice as a team―co-presentations are like dances: you must be in step with your partner for them to look good
  • Focus your practice time on transitions―hand-offs have the highest risk of going wrong
  • Know the technology―Sarah was the expert, but she needed to educate us on its fine points for the recording to work well
  • Discuss what could go wrong―contingency plans lead to fast corrections
  • Have an sense of humour―it builds and communicates rapport
  • Eat together―I remember Neil Peart, of the band Rush, talking about the importance of sharing meals with his band mates (Jocelyn shared his lunch with me twice!)

The presentation went well and as planned. We had a great time interacting with participants and ourselves. When we finished our closing comments and the recording ended, my first thought was ‘when would we get the opportunity to partner again?’ A partnership doesn’t get any better than this.

Phil

Twelve Traits of a Change Agile Organization

Change agility is rapidly becoming a key skill of successful organizations. It is the ability to quickly respond to new developments—consumer choices, competitive threats, economic conditions, government regulations, etc.—so that opportunities are realized and challenges are managed.

 
Many common practices slow down an organization’s response rate. Annual strategic planning, siloed resource management and static personal objectives (and incentives) encourage leaders and their teams to complete their commitments as originally agreed, regardless of its current importance. 

 

Agile organizations align three drivers of speed: leadership, resourcing and culture. Here are traits of a nimble organization: 

Leaders:
  • View change initiatives as a portfolio of opportunities versus a list of projects managed separately
  • Know their roles in change including acting as an unbiased assessor of value delivery
  • Are prepared to alter assumptions about an initiative even if it means changing direction and abandoning unproductive work 
  • Own the success of the change after it is launched
 
Resources:
  • Are assigned to the highest priority changes according to need versus negotiated minimum requirements
  • Have right people selected for key change roles including experience, capability and motivation
  • Are easily transferable across initiatives and roles
  • Are dedicated to measurement of benefits and continuous improvement
 
 
People:

  • See change as an enabler of ongoing success versus something to get through now
  • Understand the organization’s vision and how the change initiatives will help achieve it
  • Give honest feedback that is listened to and rewarded
  • Discuss, share and follow lessons learned
 
An organization’s ability to quickly change how it operates to achieve its goals is a key ability to ongoing success. As the speed of change continues to increase, it may not be an option. Adopting these traits could be a good start.
 
Phil

Twelve Traits of a Change Agile Organization

Change agility is rapidly becoming a key skill of successful organizations. It is the ability to quickly respond to new developments—consumer choices, competitive threats, economic conditions, government regulations, etc.—so that opportunities are realized and challenges are managed.


Many common practices slow down an organization’s response rate. Annual strategic planning, siloed resource management and static personal objectives (and incentives) encourage leaders and their teams to complete their commitments as originally agreed, regardless of its current importance. 

Agile organizations align three drivers of speed: leadership, resourcing and culture. Here are traits of a nimble organization: 

Leaders:

  • View change initiatives as a portfolio of opportunities versus a list of projects managed separately
  • Know their roles in change including acting as an unbiased assessor of value delivery
  • Are prepared to alter assumptions about an initiative even if it means changing direction and abandoning unproductive work 
  • Own the success of the change after it is launched


Resources:

  • Are assigned to the highest priority changes according to need versus negotiated minimum requirements
  • Have right people selected for key change roles including experience, capability and motivation
  • Are easily transferable across initiatives and roles
  • Are dedicated to measurement of benefits and continuous improvement


People:

  • See change as an enabler of ongoing success versus something to get through now
  • Understand the organization’s vision and how the change initiatives will help achieve it
  • Give honest feedback that is listened to and rewarded
  • Discuss, share and follow lessons learned

An organization’s ability to quickly change how it operates to achieve its goals is a key ability to ongoing success. As the speed of change continues to increase, it may not be an option. Adopting these traits could be a good start.

Phil

Take Action

Ask us a question about your change

    Your Name (required)

    Your Email (required)

    Subject

    Your Question


    Get the newsletter
    Change With Confidence
    Please type your name and email address and click on "Send". We will add you to our newsletter distribution list. Thank you.




    Get Change with Confidence
    Change With Confidence

    Get Change on the Run
    Change With Confidence